Brexit

facebook_page
twitter_page

Last quote about Brexit

Kirstene Hair
It was very difficult because you get two arguments, very strong on both sides.feedback
share this quote
Sep 23 2017
Brexit has been commented on by 395 key people in the news. You can find all of them on this page with their statements. People who have been most quoted about Brexit are: Theresa May, David Davis and Michel Barnier. For instance, the most recent quote from Theresa May is: “Clearly people, businesses and public services should only have to plan for one set of changes in the relationship between the UK and the EU. So during the implementation period access to one another's markets should continue on current terms and Britain also should continue to take part in existing security measures. And I know businesses, in particular, would welcome the certainty this would provide. As of today, these considerations point to an implementation period of around two years.”.
Automatically powered by Storyzy
Take our quote verification challenge and find out !

All quotes about Brexit

Theresa May

[We] should recognise that this is the most advanced free trade agreement the EU has yet concluded and a breakthrough in trade between Canada and the EU. But compared with what exists between Britain and the EU today, it would nevertheless represent such a restriction on our mutual market access that it would benefit neither of our economies.feedback

Nigel Farage

The most telling line of the whole speech was towards the end when she said, We don't seek an unfair competitive advantage.' Well, that's what I voted for! I voted for us to be able to be competitive, to be global, to be free of European laws.feedback

Theresa May

It's up to leaders to set the tone, a tone of trust. We want to be your strongest friend and partner as the E.U. and the U.K. thrive side by side. We want to work hand-in-hand with the European Union, rather than as part of the European Union.feedback

James Blitz

This was a determined effort to break the logjam in the talks. It is too soon to say whether Mrs May will have convinced the EU to move to phase two in a little over a month's time.feedback

Anand Menon

None of the big questions have been answered, all of the major disputes remain. The U.K. is trying to hide the fact that we want more time, which is why she insists on calling it an 'implementation phase.' But that's nonsensical, because we're not going to have a deal to implement by March 2019. We're going to have a deal to negotiate.feedback

Theresa May

It has been and remains one of my first goals in this negotiation to ensure that you can carry on living your lives as before. I am clear that the guarantee I am giving on your rights is real. And I doubt anyone with real experience of the U.K. would doubt the independence of our courts or the rigor with which they will uphold people's legal rights.feedback

Anand Menon

It allows everyone to keep trading while ensuring that we leave, and it doesn't give us special treatment in the long-term because it's explicitly time-limited. The pressure is off.feedback

Theresa May

Clearly people, businesses, and public services should only have to plan for one set of changes in the relationship between the U.K. and the EU. The framework for this strictly time-limited period, which can be agreed under Article 50, would be the existing structure of EU rules and regulations.feedback

Theresa May

We can do SO much better than this. Let us be creative as well as practical in designing an ambitious partnership. We do not pretend you can have all the benefits of the single market without its obligations. The guarantee I am giving on your rights is real.feedback

Maria Demertzis - Bruegel

I'm reassured that a deal on the citizens rights will be achieved and rather quickly, there's good things about it on both sides of the Channel, I think that will be reached. Northern Ireland comes into this, again I'm convinced that a good and satisfactory solution will be reached. And the other thing is that I have no doubt in my mind the UK will honour its agreements.feedback

Maria Demertzis - Bruegel

This is a very small issue compared to all of the other things that are big. The future relationship is much bigger, citizens rights are much bigger, these are the things that we need to spend our political time on.feedback

Michel Barnier

We stand ready to discuss the concrete implications of this pledge. We shall assess, on the basis of the commitments taken by the 28 Member States, whether this assurance covers all commitments made by the United Kingdom as a Member State of the European Union.feedback

Kirstene Hair

I didn't vote on Brexit. I took the decision not to vote on it. It was incredibly difficult. The first time I've never voted in my life. I do think we've got good opportunities for the UK.feedback

Kirstene Hair

I just ultimately couldn't make that decision and I thought I would therefore go with the will of the UK which if I'm honest I thought we would remain. Now I think we all have to get behind it and say, you know what, that's the way the country voted and we have to make the best. I do think we've got good opportunities for the UK.feedback

Claus Vistesen - Pantheon Macroeconomics

Output and new orders are rising briskly. Meanwhile, private sector activity in both services and manufacturing remain strong enough to increase work backlogs and increase employment.feedback

Julien Lafague - JPMorgan Chase & Co.

We view the strength in the single currency as the reflection of an improving growth outlook, which justifies a gradual normalisation of the ECB's extremely accommodative policy.feedback

Sergi Pardos-Prado

These coalitions we saw in Brexit and Trump is very difficult to maintain in Germany.feedback

Theresa May

We want you to stay, we value you, and we thank you for your contribution to our national life. Our determination to defend the stability, security and prosperity of our European neighbors and friends remains steadfast. And we will do all this as a sovereign nation in which the British people are in control.feedback

Thomas Walde

People are generally quite happy. Then Germans look around the world and they see, Brexit, Donald Trump, the refugee crisis ... all these challenges and Merkel is seen as a steady hand.feedback

Norbert Lösing

It's very German to stick to what is working. There are a lot of problems in other countries, think Donald Trump or Brexit … with Merkel there is a sense that there is no great problem that she couldn't overcome and that she's a politician you can trust.feedback

Anna Leach

Manufacturers continue to report solid growth in output, while total order books and export order books are holding firm. Expectations for selling prices were largely in line with the previous month, but price pressures do appear to have moderated somewhat since earlier in the year.feedback

Theresa May

I do not want our partners to fear that they will need to pay more or receive less over the remainder of the current budget plan as a result of our decision to leave. The UK will honour commitments we have made during the period of our membership. And as we move forwards, we will also want to continue working together in ways that promote the long-term economic development of our continent.feedback

Boris Johnson

I think what was so uplifting about this speech was it was positive - it was confident about what Britain can do but also about our relations with the rest of the EU.feedback

Theresa May

But the fact is that, at that point, neither the UK – nor the EU and its member states – will be in a position to implement smoothly many of the detailed arrangements that will underpin this new relationship we seek.feedback

Neil Carmichael

The business community is getting worried now. I think it needs a longer period. This is a postponement – and the continued lack of clarity on the final deal is still a big problem.feedback

Jeremy Corbyn

Fifteen months after the EU referendum the government is still no clearer about what our long-term relationship with the EU will look like. The only advance seems to be that the prime minister has listened to Labour and faced up to the reality that Britain needs a transition on the same basic terms to provide stability for businesses and workers. That's because Theresa May and her Conservative cabinet colleagues are spending more time negotiating with each other rather than with the EU.feedback

Mats Persson

From the European Union's point of view, it probably takes us 50 percent of the way there. It's moving us forward, but whether it constitutes 'significant progress' for the E.U., I am just not sure.feedback

Simon Jenkins

Florence is the prime minister’s chance to build bridges with EU negotiators and quell the revolt from within her party. But will she take it?At last Theresa May will make the speech she should have made a year ago. Her Florence proposals are clearly intended to decontaminate the polluted air round the Brexit talks. She hopes for concord with EU negotiators on a compromise first step towards British departure, on a reasonable timetable. There has to be a deal on this. There has to be a move back from the “cliff-edge” option. But can she deliver?feedback

Ciaran Carvalho

Optimism about the commercial real estate market remains subdued but the level of pessimism has fallen dramatically and this perhaps indicates that in spite of an ongoing sense of uncertainty around Brexit, investors have recovered from the initial shock of the leave vote and have started to look to the future with greater confidence.feedback

Michel Barnier

We will listen attentively and constructively to Theresa May's important speech tomorrow in Florence. A rapid agreement on the conditions of the UK's orderly withdrawal, and a transition period, is possible ... For that to happen, we would like the United Kingdom to put on the table, as soon as next week, proposals to overcome the barriers.feedback

Laura Kuenssberg - BBC

UK willing to pay 20 billion euros during transition period but only if we have access to single market and some form of customs union.feedback

Miles Celic - TheCityUK

For our industry, this really is crunch time. Many firms are already moving parts of their operations out of the UK and Europe. When they've gone, it's hard to see them coming back. Even if the UK and EU agree the best possible Brexit deal by 2019, without urgent clarity on transitional arrangements, business will assume the worst and act accordingly.feedback

Michel Barnier

The question facing us over the coming months is serious, but simple: will the United Kingdom leave in an orderly fashion with an agreement, or not? From our side, I repeat once again that an agreement is the best outcome. It is in our common interest. But if we want a deal, time is of the essence. We are a few days away from the fourth round of negotiations. I am asking myself questions. I'm wondering why – beyond the progress we've made on certain points – there is still today major uncertainty on each of the key issues of the first phase.feedback

Peter Bone

Any divorce bill would be too much for me ... If you ask my constituents, in Wellingborough we want an urgent care centre. We've been campaigning for years, and it's a few million pounds. And we are told there is not enough money for that. If we're then told we're giving £20bn to subsidise Romania and Poland, I think my constituents, and I think constituents around the country, would be furious about that.feedback

Dominique Welbank

As a French national having lived here since 1991, and having been denied permanent residence because I do not have comprehensive sickness insurance, I have no confidence the Home Office will not extend this scheme to EU citizens like myself because of Brexit.feedback

Jeremy Corbyn

We are opposed to TTIP-style deregulation and investor protection deals with the Trump administration, which is precisely what this Tory government wants to use Brexit for. We want trade based on fairness, open rules and strong rights and protections.feedback

Peter Klepsch

I know a lot of EU doctors and nurses who are saying, I'm not going to stay very much longer.feedback

Michel Barnier

There is therefore only one year left to swiftly reach an agreement on the United Kingdom's orderly withdrawal.feedback

Jonathan Lis

For MPs concerned about the impact on the economy, article 127 on EEA exit is an opportunity: if parliament wishes to avoid hard Brexit, it could be key. As the government continues its mission to pull Britain out of the single market at apparently any cost, the last hope for remainers and soft Brexiters could lie in the least glamorous and most surprising of places: article 127 of the 1994 European Economic Area (EEA) agreement. This obscure legal clause could, indeed, be all that stands between Britain’s economy and a cliff edge.feedback

Steve Murrells - The Co-operative Bank

The reward scheme is absolutely the right thing to do when people are strapped for cash because of Brexit.feedback

Guy Verhofstadt

Some British politicians – not to name Boris Johnson – criticise their countrymen and women for wanting to keep their European identity. He accuses them of 'split allegiance'. I think this is a binary, old-fashioned and reductionist understanding of identity. I think we need to be smarter, more open and more inventive then that. It is this position that needs to be defended by our European Union just as the European Union needs to [make sure] there is no return to the past, to hard borders on our continent, and certainly not to a hard border between Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic.feedback

Guy Verhofstadt

Certainly the cows couldn't see it. Cows from the north eating grass from the south, milked in the north by a farmer from the south with their milk bottled in the south. I'm a Belgian so surrealism comes naturally to me, but to reinstate the border would be more than surreal, it would be totally absurd, even for me.feedback

Guy Verhofstadt

It's nonsense to talk about split allegiance. It's perfectly possible to feel English, British and European at the same time. As it is perfectly normal to be a Dubliner, Irish and European at the same time.feedback

Rachel Reeves

Brexit represents the biggest change for British business in the last 40 years. I want Brexit to work for business. It's vital that the voices of employers and employees are clearly heard during the negotiating process; and that the Government listens.feedback

Nicola Sturgeon

Obviously I'm thinking pretty deeply about it. I think Brexit is a complete and utter car crash – an unfolding disaster. I haven't changed my views on that, and I think it's deeply wrong for [Scotland] to be taken down that path without the ability to decide whether that's right or not.feedback

Phil Hogan

Mr Johnson is behaving and acting and speaking strangely. It's clear that his reputation is not good and he is a diminished figure in the Government.feedback

Vitor Constancio - European Central Bank

In economic terms, one has to only consider the size of the UK economy and the size of the rest of the EU to see that the consequences and the disruption would be much more significant for the smaller part in that negotiation than the EU as a whole. I don't expect, and no one is expecting, that Brexit will mean that there would be no trade between the two parts. That won't happen. So there will not be a total disappearance of trade. Not at all.feedback

Stephen Crabb

UK government ministers probably have to say a bit more and to give a bit more to try to bridge the gulf at the moment.feedback

Michael Russell

There needs to be an injection of trust into the negotiating process.feedback

Michael Russell

We are willing to cooperate with the UK government but this cannot mean allowing (Britain's national parliament) to drive a coach and horses through the devolution settlement.feedback

Phil Hogan

So it strikes me that he is completely out of the loop in relation to the type of concrete proposals that are required and that are being considered by the U.K. government.feedback

Boris Johnson

I don't think the sums should be too high, but it is obviously legitimate and right that we should pay our dues – we are a law-abiding country – during the period of membership. Where our lawyers say we are on the hook for stuff, then we are going to have to pay. But what I do not envisage is that we should pay into the EU just for access to the single market, or some such concept. It does not seem to be necessary. We do not get money for access to our markets.feedback

Phil Hogan

Clearly, he is not directly involved in the negotiations on behalf of the British Government with the EU. He certainly has made very strange statements that are completely contradictory, and completely at odds with his own Government's position as well as the possibility of being reasonable with the EU in finalising a deal.feedback

Frances Fitzgerald

As we face into the challenges of Brexit, we are determined to pursue and seize new opportunities and the Government has, therefore, been making strenuous efforts to ensure that we have the right conditions in place in Ireland to attract the key knowledge based sectors.feedback

Guy Verhofstadt

It's for the UK to come forward with the unique solution for that problem, but I think that all solutions to avoid the border. And we don't want that Ireland becomes a bargaining chip in the negotiations. That's not in the interest of Ireland and not in the interest of Europe.feedback

John Holland-Kaye - Heathrow

Preparing for a post-Brexit economy means this budget must include practical, deliverable and binding plans to support all of the UK. Abolishing APD on domestic flights is a bold move that would supercharge British competitiveness, make it cheaper for British businesses to get to London and beyond and ensure every part of our country can prosper in the future.feedback

Boris Johnson

No of course not, we are going to deliver a fantastic Brexit... We are a Government working together. We are a nest of singing birds.feedback

Boris Johnson

We have a duty in the UK government to have strong, dynamic, vibrant relations with our number one ally and the most powerful nation on Earth.feedback

Boris Johnson

If it looks like ethnic cleansing, it is best to draw that conclusion.feedback

Vince Cable - Stansted Airport

I want our party to lead the fight against Brexit. In the real world, we have yet to experience the full impact of leaving Europe. But we've had a taste of what is to come in the fall of the value of the pound.feedback

Manuel Cortés

A failure to examine the facts surrounding free movement, and the vital contribution workers from across the EU make, has led some sections of the left to involve themselves in a debate which pitches worker against worker. Many of the people most concerned about immigration – those left behind by globalisation – are the first to be impacted by the absence of these workers from our public services and vital food industries.feedback

Keir Starmer

She is going to have to face down Boris Johnson and his fantasy version of Brexit, particularly in relation to financial liabilities. And she needs to abandon some of her inflexible red lines. The worst outcome is that she says nothing, inflames the situation, making progress less likely.feedback

Keir Starmer

There is a general recognition [in Brussels] that the Labour party has got itself in the right position and sensible position on transitional arrangements. No-one is talking in terms of bespoke deals.feedback

Keir Starmer

I'm not sure what Boris said is taken that seriously. They want progress, and they are concerned about methodology [on the financial settlement] ... There is clearly cause for concern about the rate of progress in Brussels just as there is in the UK. And the ball is very much in the prime minister's court.feedback

Keir Starmer

We have always said the UK should honour its international obligations. I think the government is right not to put a figure on it, I don't think the government or the EU should put a figure on it, and I have never challenged David Davis on that. But it is important that the framework is agreed. At the moment there is no clarity on the approach the UK is going to take. A methodology is needed and it is needed essentially by next week.feedback

Valdis Dombrovskis - European Commission

Finance in Europe is changing due to the departure of the UK from the EU.feedback

Valdis Dombrovskis - European Commission

Eventually we could arrive at a single European capital markets supervisor.feedback

Diane Dodds

We will not countenance a solution that makes us different from other parts of the United Kingdom. He's very clear in dismissing the papers which the British government have produced to date and so I did find him a very understanding man and we need to take these opportunities to engage with him. I believe he's someone who has been very aware of the implications of Brexit on the island of Ireland and someone who has been very strong in setting out his position on issues which need to be resolved before moving on to the next stage of negotiations.feedback

Peter Hain

The responsibility for finding a solution to the Irish border issue lies with the UK government, and over a year after the referendum we are yet to hear any realistic and concrete proposals from them. Brexit must not lead to the reimposition of a hard border on the island of Ireland. That is non-negotiable. A hard border would damage the economy by restricting trade, and harm the lives of thousands of people who cross it every day. And in doing so it would damage the peace process at a time when power-sharing has never looked so fragile.feedback

Guy Verhofstadt

With every proposal there is scepticism, that's normal in politics, but we are debating it.feedback

Diane Dodds

We've made very clear to him today the issues which we need to see: we need to remain in the customs union, we need to have access to the single market, we need to see no return to hard borders and to see citizens have access to the European court of justice.feedback

Peter Hain

We need real solutions from the government to ensure this nightmare scenario does not happen. Theresa May urgently needs to provide answers soon.feedback

Jonathan Portes

What should transition look like? What to do about the Brexit bill? The prime minister needs to clearly articulate her stance at Friday’s speech in Florence. We are approaching what Alex Ferguson used to refer to as “squeaky bum time”: the summit at which EU leaders will decide whether “sufficient progress” has been made on Article 50 negotiations to allow trade talks to start kicks off on 19 October. Michel Barnier, the EU’s chief negotiator, has set October 2018 as the tentative date for the end of the negotiations as a whole. Moreover, the longer the talks continue without visible progress, the more businesses will start planning and preparing for the worst, “no deal” scenario – which will not be good news for the UK. So there is much to be done. And not much time to do it. Consequently, Theresa May’s speech in Florence on Friday is of crucial importance.feedback

Boris Johnson

The prime minister has been clear that they're all working together and they're all heading in the same direction.feedback

Alistair Fitt

The result for Horizon 2020 was awards should be made with excellence as the first criteria. But I dare say if that decision hadn't been taken the UK wouldn't still be the only bit of Europe that gets more money out of this pot than we put in. If FP9 was to become completely focused on capacity building rather than research excellence I think it would be very hard for the UK to do well out of that. We've got years of experience recruiting international students, it's something we know how to do.feedback

Alistair Fitt

I had expected that by now this would be a problem. And I have talked to people in universities who have said what a huge problem it is and what terrible experiences they have had. But I haven't found a single case of a recruitment issue that didn't happen because of Brexit. That's not to say it won't happen in the future.feedback

Alistair Fitt

I think people are generally smart. I think they know that what we've heard from Lord Adonis is a bit of a red herring.feedback

Alistair Fitt

It's not just the money, it's about access to facilities and access to people. And the sticking point will be whether we have any say in what happens to the money.feedback

Alistair Fitt

I've tried as often as I can to reiterate the importance of EU and international staff. But of course there are still a lot of unknowns.feedback

Rafael Behr

Faced with the serious work and compromise that exiting the EU requires, many leavers are opting for fantasy, bombast and obstruction instead. Everything in politics is harder than it looks. Theresa May is not the first person to reach high office, only to discover that the skills used for getting a job are insufficient for doing it well. Boris Johnson – unlike his boss in most ways – is in a similar bind. He is a more gifted performer than the prime minister, but loquacity isn’t competence.feedback

Kevin Green

Employers are showing a great deal of resilience as they continue to hire despite a growing number losing faith in the direction the economy is heading. The political climate isn't helping the situation. Businesses need clarity in order to plan effectively and so far the Brexit negotiations have not resolved any of the core issues. An early agreement on the settlement of EU nationals already working in the UK would be a step in the right direction. The vast majority of EU nationals residing in the UK come here to work and make a valuable contribution to our economy.feedback

Eddie Curzon

Despite the political uncertainty in the air, London continues to enjoy sound economic health and strong business fundamentals. It's clear Brexit is weighing heavily on minds in the capital though, so it's absolutely vital that substantive progress is achieved during the Brexit negotiations and that comprehensive, time-limited transitional arrangements are agreed with all urgency.feedback

Boris Johnson

I am mystified by all this stuff. Not me, guv. I don't know where it is coming from, honestly. It feels to me like an attempt to keep the great snore-athon story about my article running. I think that is what is going on.feedback

Boris Johnson

I am confident she will set out an exciting and positive vision for Brexit and it will be a speech around which everyone can unite.feedback

Stuart Drummond

It's completely unfair to say the people of Hartlepool are racist and xenophobic. The Tall Ships event was staged here a couple of years ago and we had crews from all around the world and they said we were the most welcoming town they had berthed in. We were at war with the French at the time and people were scared and frightened. They didn't want anything to do with the French. But that's completely different to today's situation and to associate that mentality with the Brexit situation is wrong.feedback

Toby Olié

The play can be viewed as an allegory for Brexit. We'd like that in people's minds when they watch the show. Blame is being placed on minority groups. But whether you agree with them or not there are reasons they [Leavers] voted the way they did and we have to take the audience on a journey with us to understand the choices people in the play make.feedback

Vince Cable - Stansted Airport

There are sensible grown-ups in the Conservative Party and the Labour Party and the Greens... We have got to put aside tribal differences and work alongside like-minded people to keep the Single Market and Customs Union, which is so essential for trade and jobs.feedback

George Osborne

In the battles over Brexit, and over the future direction of the Conservative Party, some harsh words have been said about the Prime Minister. Her advisers created a poisonous atmosphere among senior Tories. But they are now gone, and a much more consensual team has recently replaced them in Downing Street. Mrs May's critics in her party will want to respond in kind.feedback

Vince Cable - Stansted Airport

Foreign exchange dealers are not point-scoring politicians, they make cool, hard, unsentimental judgements. Quite simply, that Brexit Britain will be poorer and weaker than if we had decided to stay in Europe.feedback

Carwyn Jones

The governments of these islands have a lot of work to do to ensure that the UK leaves the EU with as little disruption as possible. This will only be achieved by working together. Theresa May, Nicola Sturgeon and I all have very different political positions, but an issue as important as Brexit requires us to put our political differences aside and work together to provide stability for the sake of our economy, jobs and public services. One Government cannot simply hijack powers from the other two.feedback

Stephen Gallo - BMO Capital Markets

His departure may mean a higher chance of a 'soft Brexit' which the FX market will treat as GBP-positive. However, his departure could also lead to a wider rift within the CON (ruling-Conservative) Party itself.feedback

Carl Emmerson

The forecast health of the public finances was downgraded by £15 billion ($20.25 billion) per year – or almost £300 million per week – as a direct result of the Brexit vote. We are likely to make a net fiscal loss from it. Those are the numbers and forecasts which the government has adopted.feedback

Carl Emmerson

(This is) funding that could in principle go to the National Health Service rather than the EU. But this would involve no state support for any other activities, such as subsidies for agriculture that are at present funded in the U.K. by the EU. It is perhaps surprising that members of the government are suggesting rather different figures.feedback

Mark Carney - Bank of England

Abrupt decreases in migration could result in shortages in some sectors that have become reliant on migrant labour, and contribute more materially to inflationary pressures. Brexit could therefore ultimately have only a modest impact on prices in general equilibrium.feedback

Vince Cable - Stansted Airport

What the country now desperately needs is some political adults. There are sensible grown-ups in the Conservative Party, and the Labour Party and the Greens. We believe the public have a right to change their mind. At the end of these tortuous divorce negotiations, the British public must be given a vote on the outcome.feedback

Boris Johnson

We have one big card left to play in a pretty poor hand and that is the cash we can provide for the reconstruction of Syria. It is vital that we do not play that card prematurely, but instead when there is a serious political process that will culminate in elections in which not only the people in Syria, but the 12 million or so that have been expelled are able to vote. If we can get a political process that will lead to a transition away from Assad then we should play the reconstruction card.feedback

Boris Johnson

We want them back in Paris, I am not saying it is going to happen overnight. There may be things we have to do, but we will work on them.feedback

Vince Cable - Stansted Airport

I want our party to lead the fight against Brexit. But we should not be consumed by Brexit to the exclusion of everything else. We are not a single-issue party – we are not Ukip in reverse. I see our future as a party of government…and my role as your leader is to be a credible potential Prime Minister.feedback

Owen Jones

For the last two years, Britain has been held hostage by the Tories’ disastrous scheming. Now acrimony is erupting and Brexit looks ever more shambolic. A Stephen King film set to the Benny Hill theme tune: that’s Britain’s current political plight. It feels like a horror show without end yet it is simultaneously preposterous and absurd. For the last two years, Britain has been held hostage by the Tories’ disastrous scheming, plotting and manoeuvring: the EU referendum campaign, the chaotic aftermath, the snap general election. Boris Johnson – and goodness knows what we all did in a past life to deserve him – opportunistically backed Brexit as a career move. Despite his demonstrable buffoonery, he is astute enough to realise that Tory Brexit is spiralling into disaster. He risks going down in the history books as one of the principal architects of a national catastrophe. So now he plots and schemes, helping to plunge an already politically crippled Tory administration into further turmoil as Britain navigates through its postwar greatest crisis.feedback

Carl Emmerson

The bigger picture is that the forecast health of the public finances was downgraded by £15bn per year - or almost £300m per week - as a direct result of the Brexit vote. Not only will we not regain control of £350m weekly as a result of Brexit, we are likely to make a net fiscal loss from it. Those are the numbers and forecasts which the government has adopted. It is perhaps surprising that members of the government are suggesting rather different figures.feedback

Hayley Scott - Investec

Certainly in some locations I think we've already reach a saturation point. Developers now struggle to find good sites for new buildings and construction has been impacted by the Brexit vote because it's now more difficult to secure labour and materials. I think we all just need to be a bit more cautious and make sure costings are where they should be.feedback

Amber Rudd

Recent events in the UK and across Europe have shown the criminal and terrorist threats we face are varied and increasingly international. The long-standing collaboration we have with our European partners allows us to jointly address these threats and keep our citizens safe. As we prepare to leave the EU it is therefore vital that we agree a new way to ensure continued security, law enforcement and criminal justice cooperation.feedback

Mark Carney - Bank of England

On balance, the de-integration effects of Brexit can be expected to ... be inflationary. At present, the main question concerns the extent to which this adjustment has been brought forward. The case for a modest monetary tightening is reinforced by the possibility that global r* (equilibrium interest rates) may be rising, meaning that monetary policy has to move in order to stand still.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

I am attached to a strict approach to Brexit: I respect the British vote but the worst thing would be a sort of weak EU vis-a-vis the British.feedback

Nigel Farage

Reading Boris Johnson's vision for Brexit cheered me up. Someone in government is finally being positive about what we voted for.feedback

Kevin Ellis - PricewaterhouseCoopers

The more transparent we are with our diversity and social mobility data, the more we hold ourselves accountable to achieving real change. This is a strong set of results from what we found to be a tough set of conditions following Brexit.feedback

Viraj Patel

Any BoE-fuelled sterling rally may be on its last legs; what we have defined as a 'withdrawal of stimulus' hiking cycle is now priced into the currency. The medium-term narrative for sterling will continue to be dominated by Brexit, with Prime Minister Theresa May's keynote speech in Florence taking centre stage on Friday.feedback

John Cryan - Deutsche Bank

The more clarity we have, the earlier the better. That goes without saying. But I think, just on a contingency planning basis, it's right to think the worst.feedback

John McFarlane - Barclays

We are all planning for the worst, but hoping for the better. The EU is about 10 percent of our total bank and, therefore, if we were moving all of it, then we would have to move the balance sheet. However, if wholesale activities can remain in London, we don't have to move the balance sheet and therefore, we don't have to move too many people.feedback

John McFarlane - Barclays

We've given good advice on what is sensible to move, what's sensible to retain and what of the foreign activities in London is sensible to retain and how that should be gone about.feedback

Jean Lemierre - BNP Paribas

If negotiations are such that there will be new allocation of resources across the continent, it will go to various places. It will go to Frankfurt, to Amsterdam, to Dublin and of course, to Paris. And Paris is well placed. He may be biased.feedback

John Cryan - Deutsche Bank

No I don't think so. Those estimates are difficult to gauge because the scenarios can be different. We're in a happier position because our capital and our bank are already German. So we can designate the London branch to something but only as a booking center. I do think that Frankfurt will benefit the most. I think it will be the clear winner of the other European centers.feedback

Keir Starmer

Moving key individuals at this critical time adds a whole new dimension to the government's chaotic approach to Brexit. Deep divisions in the Cabinet and a complete lack of leadership are putting the national interest at risk.feedback

Simon Derrick - Bank of New York

What's interesting is the expectation of a rate hike is having a greater influence (on the pound) than some of the political issues that potentially could have weighed on sterling in a way that they might have done six months ago. We're still in the middle of Brexit negotiations, we've got the Conservative party conference coming up and we're in a time of political uncertainty.feedback

Layla Moran

It's not just the leadership, there is a portion of the wider party that still kind of believes this too, that somehow we are going to go back into government at any moment. And I think we need to kind of accept we're not.feedback

Andrew Gimson

He is offering himself as a different kind of leader, who would negotiate in a different spirit.feedback

Andrew Gimson

Boris has been sidelined in this negotiation.feedback

Mujtaba Rahman

His article made no mention of a transitional phase and rejected the Chancellor Philip Hammond's plan to pay for Single Market access. While Johnson's intervention will inevitably be seen as a leadership bid by his critics, it is probably more of a marker; a reminder to the prime minister that she will face a difficult conference and that she should not freeze him out of the Brexit process.feedback

David Bloom

The Bank of England's unexpected hunger to join other G10 central banks in the race to the exit from accommodative monetary policy has given additional impetus to sterling, a currency that has happily ignored the political intrigue of Brexit throughout 2017.feedback

David Davis

Together with the EU we have developed some of the world's most sophisticated systems in the fight against crime because cross-border cooperation is absolutely crucial if we're to keep our citizens safe and bring criminals to justice. That is why we want to build a new partnership with the EU that goes beyond any existing relationship it has with non-member states, so we can continue countering these cross-border threats together.feedback

Vince Cable - Stansted Airport

The public should resolve this and have a choice – do they want to press ahead with the result of what the government has achieved, good or bad, or do they want an exit from Brexit? I think it's the only way of resolving this issue and giving the country a stable, long-term future.feedback

Ed Davey

Theresa May must not let her insecurity in the face of Boris Johnson's latest outburst deflect from the pressing need to keep existing EU crime-fighting measures. This government has finally woken up to the fact that security cooperation with our European partners is vital. We should welcome this as a starting point. But instead of accepting a role for the ECJ, the paper repeats Theresa May's ridiculous red line.This level of delusion would be laughable if it wasn't so concerning.feedback

George Freeman

It is just far too early to be able to make wild promises about what exactly is going to be coming out of the Brexit negotiations ... It's not a figure I would have repeated, and he's not the health secretary and it needs to be negotiated.feedback

Jean-Claude Juncker - European Commission

This will be a very sad and tragic moment in our history. We will always regret this, and I think that you will regret it as well, soon. Nonetheless we have to respect the will of the British people. But we are going to make progress.feedback

Jo Swinson

A few years ago it would have seemed inconceivable that in such a crisis, China would be a voice of reason, and Russia more measured than America. The politics of the bully is back. Human rights are trampled. Climate change is denied. Hate and division are spread like poison into society. Brexit will make it harder to follow our values, to protect human rights, to tackle climate change, to solve global problems.feedback

Boris Johnson

Once we have settled our accounts, we will take back control of roughly 350 million pounds ($476 million) a week. It would be a fine thing, as many of us have pointed out, if a lot of that money went on the NHS (National Health Service).feedback

Amber Rudd

I think she has a point, yes. I think it's absolutely fine. I would expect nothing less from Boris. She's driving the car, to continue the allegory, and I'm going to make sure that as far as I'm concerned the rest of the Cabinet we help her do that. This is a difficult moment. You could call it backseat driving, absolutely. I'm very clear that the Cabinet and government supports Theresa May. It's a difficult moment to make sure we get the best result for the United Kingdom, but I'm sure we can.feedback

Amber Rudd

You could call it backseat driving. Unfortunately not. I had rather a lot to do on Friday. There was a bomb that nearly went off in Parsons Green. Yesterday I chaired Cobra, I went to see the police. No, I didn't have time to read the piece. She "has a point.feedback

David Davis

We already have a deep level of collaboration with the EU on security matters and it is in both our interests to find ways to maintain it. We approach negotiations on our future special partnership with the EU as an opportunity to build on our existing achievements. A new security treaty with the EU would be underpinned by our shared principles, and should make sure our partnership has the agility to respond to the ever-changing threats we face.feedback

Carwyn Jones

The difficulty with the Westminster government is that I have no idea what their view is. They don't have a collective view. There are different views held by different ministers. The fear I have is that the UK is not seen as a serious player anymore, and that's bad for all of us who live in the UK. As for the prime minister, she's not visible. As someone who wants the UK to stay together, I don't want daft decisions such as the current bill to cause the UK to begin to unravel. I'm a devolutionist who believes in the union. I don't think they get that in Whitehall.feedback

Carwyn Jones

I think there are some of them who take the view the UK is the same as it was in 1972, a unitary state with one government. They have not got devolution for the last 20 years, and there is danger in that. We can't allow people to think the choice is between a centralised state and independence.feedback

Carwyn Jones

That affected people's views of themselves. Young people in Wales didn't see a future for themselves in Wales. Now they stay here. They can see their future here. There are opportunities here that didn't exist in the nineties.feedback

Carwyn Jones

There is a wiser and more sensible choice, which is devolution in the UK context. Does that mean federalism? It means something close to it. Federalism is difficult because of England. What do you do with England? But it means that the UK is a partnership of four nations, not one that imposes its will on everyone else.feedback

Carwyn Jones

There's no reason why the union can't stay together. There is every possibility of creating a modern democratic state where there are different centres of democratic accountability rather than one, London.feedback

Carwyn Jones

People could see what it would look like. The problem with the [EU] referendum was that the vote was to leave, but there was any number of interpretations over what that meant.feedback

Carwyn Jones

People want to see improvements in the health service, our GCSE results improving. They want to see the school building programme continuing, but Brexit sits there in the background. We can't be prosperous unless we have the fullest possible access to the single market. That's hugely important for us, 67% of our exports go there. Any obstacle and we lose jobs. It's that simple. We don't have to have the sort of Brexit that the Tories are proposing.feedback

Carwyn Jones

I think there are great challenges for the UK. To my mind the EU was part of the glue that held the UK together.feedback

Carwyn Jones

There were a lot of people who voted leave for reasons that have nothing to do with the EU. A lot of people said to me on the doorstep: 'We're going to kick David Cameron. Don't worry, we're still Labour.' I heard that more than anything else. The EU was a minor issue in the referendum about the EU.feedback

Norman Lamb

A lot of people felt that we were treating them as if they were idiots for having voted for Brexit. And yet, as liberals, we ought to understand people's anxieties about remote power.feedback

Matthew d'Ancona

The foreign secretary’s mantle has passed elsewhere. But that should be no comfort to the party he has long dreamed of leading. Please understand: this is not a new leadership bid by Boris Johnson. The foreign secretary’s long article about Brexit in the Daily Telegraph is merely the latest chapter in a campaign for the top job that began in May 1997, when he stood (unsuccessfully) as Conservative candidate in Clwyd South – and probably earlier. Those who are surprised have not been paying attention.feedback

Chuka Umunna

Yet again Boris's outright lying has been exposed by Britain's statistics watchdog. The £350m figure was simply wrong during the referendum campaign, and it's wrong now. Boris's compulsive lying means he has lost the right to be heard on Brexit. He should give his leadership ambitions a rest and apologise for his continual use of dodgy statistics.feedback

Jo Swinson

We are absolutely right to fight for an exit from Brexit. Brexit will make it harder to follow our values, to protect human rights, to tackle climate change, to solve global problems. An exit from Brexit is necessary, but not sufficient.feedback

Amber Rudd

I think she has a point - I had a very busy weekend dealing with what could have been a terrible attack on our public transport.feedback

Amber Rudd

I want to make sure that the government delivers on that and brings as many of the 48 with us as well. I would say to [Johnson] come with us and make sure you support the government on trying to unite people around the exit we are going to deliver.feedback

Amber Rudd

You could call it backseat driving. I don't want him managing the Brexit process. What we've got is Theresa May managing that process, she's driving the car.feedback

Christopher Bailey - Burberry Group

And just talking from a very selfish point of view, I think the Britishness resonates globally.feedback

Michel Barnier

The single market and its four freedoms are indivisible – cherry-picking is not an option.feedback

Ruth Davidson

On the day of a terror attack where Britons were maimed, just hours after the threat level is raised, our only thoughts should be on service.feedback

Boris Johnson

We would not expect to pay for access to their markets any more than they would expect to pay for access to ours. My friends, I must report that there are at least some people who are woefully underestimating this country. They think Brexit is not going to happen. I am here to tell you that this country will succeed in our new national enterprise, and will succeed mightily.feedback

Boris Johnson

My friends, I must report that there are at least some people who are woefully underestimating this country. They think Brexit isn't going to happen. I am here to tell you that this country will succeed in our new national enterprise, and will succeed mightily. Looking forward to PM's Florence Speech. All behind Theresa for a glorious Brexit. And yes – once we have settled our accounts, we will take back control of roughly 350 million pounds per week. It would be a fine thing, as many of us have pointed out, if a lot of that money went on the NHS (health service).feedback

Boris Johnson

They think that we will simply despair of finding the way out of the EU and sit down on the floor and cry – like some toddler lost in the maze at Hampton Court. Well, in so far as they doubt our resolve, I believe they are wrong; and I am here to tell you that this country will succeed in our new national enterprise, and will succeed mightily.feedback

Boris Johnson

Outside the EU there are obvious opportunities - in agriculture, fisheries, in the setting of indirect taxation. At the stroke of a pen, the Chancellor will be able to cut VAT on tampons; often demanded by Parliament but - absurdly - legally impossible to deliver. We will have an immigration (system) that suits the UK, not slamming the door - but welcoming the talent we need, from the EU and around the world. Of course we will make sure that business gets the skills it needs, but business will no longer be able to use immigration as an excuse not to invest in the young people of this country.feedback

Tony Hall - BBC

Impartiality has always been the cornerstone of BBC News. It remains so today.feedback

Ed Davey

It's good ministers have stopped threatening to use our collective security as a Brexit bargaining chip, but this proposal is deeply muddled. Britain must be part of Europe's top crime-fighting tools like the European arrest warrant and shared databases on criminals. But the prime minister's refusal to support any deal where the European court of justice retains judicial oversight is damaging our chances of preserving this vital co-operation.feedback

Vasco Cal

Whatever Britain fails to pay, Germany will have to pay. I think the UK is looking to hold out on an offer of money until the end, when they will agree to pay for their commitments made in the past but not for access to the internal market during the transition period. The idea being that there will be so much relief among the EU that it will be accepted. It's a gamble, of course. It could go wrong.feedback

Mairead McGuinness

It is more sluggish than we would like it to be. I think from the EU side the timeline needs to be respected. It seems at some point [the British] decided, forget what we agreed and we will talk with the member states. But that's not possible. We would like to hear her say that she will do as agreed, and make progress on the three opening issues. And it seems there has been less movement on money than the other two.feedback

Guntram Wolff - Bruegel

Things are being lost in translation – it's a matter of learning to talk to each other. I would never underestimate the importance of process and the legal framework for the negotiations to the EU. For better or worse, that is how the EU works. Because they are a collective entity of 27 member states, the EU can't – or it is very difficult to – go beyond [what has been agreed already].feedback

Gianni Pittella

Boris Johnson is embarrassing his country once again by repeating the lies of the Leave campaign. He is jeopardising the Brexit negotiations by threatening to turn the UK into a low-regulation economy. And he insults the intelligence of the British people with his tub-thumping jingoism. It is more in keeping with Trump Towers than Whitehall.feedback

Peter Clegg

A situation like this is likely to highlight that territories like the BVI are vulnerable and cannot rely on the benevolence of the UK. Their great hope, going forward, was exporting fish to the European market, but all territories are now quite concerned about the implications of Brexit and how that may impact free movement and also EU aid.feedback

Nigel Farage

The hard left has made my life a complete misery over the last four or five years. I've had to live with 24/7 security. I've had threats, physical assaults against me, my family. And this is all from people who are in organizations that profess themselves to be about love and hope and optimism, all right? He needs family around him.feedback

Tony Blair

The idea that the handful of right-wing media proprietors here are some ordinary Joes from the street, I mean, it's ridiculous. There are elites on both sides. No is the answer to that. Drawing a line from Princess Diana to Brexit is a bit of a stretch, I would say.feedback

Nigel Farage

What are political parties for? Are they there for their own sake? If you're in politics because you want to be something, then parties are essential. If you're in politics because you want to do something, parties are vehicles.feedback

Tony Blair

The fact that someone's not got a long institutional experience of these issues isn't necessarily a disadvantage.feedback

Tony Blair

Spending time in his company is well spent because he's got an amazing political mind.feedback

Nigel Farage

I don't think Harry's ready to marry anyone yet.feedback

Tony Blair

The strongman form of government says, I'm just going to bust through the systems not delivering for you and I'm going to deliver. It's got an appeal. I think the threat to what I would call traditional democracy is bigger than we think.feedback

Tony Blair

What I would say is that our anxiety, particularly straight after 9/11, was that you would end up in a situation where these unstable dictatorships, you know, which combined with terrorism to cause mass destruction. One of the things I've learned about this issue is that there's no point in me trying to relitigate it with people.feedback

Donald J. Trump

Making sense of it is very hard. I feel like a student of politics again.feedback

Tony Blair

You've just got to make sure that you try and keep the country together and united and, look, it was an extraordinary time because I'd literally just come into office. If you think back to when she became queen, roughly when I was born. Yeah, I mean, it's great.feedback

Tony Blair

I think the only way of changing the Brexit situation is to say, We've listened, we've heard, we're going to act on these problems, but we're going to act in a way that is sensible, that is consistent with our values.feedback

Tony Blair

I don't think you can adopt a politics that essentially says that those grievances are unjustified or irrelevant, or say, I'm just going to focus on something else because that's really more important than your grievance.feedback

Christopher Bailey - Burberry Group

It is a much smaller world today than it has ever been, in terms of being able to trade. We as a business have always traded globally. The possibilities and the potential for growth both locally here in the UK and overseas is enormous.feedback

Viraj Patel

A November rate hike shouldn't be viewed as a sure-fire bet; we suspect that it is largely conditional on two factors: signs of a rebound in domestically generated inflation (namely wage growth) and a reduction in short-term political uncertainty.feedback

Tim Martin

As a result of their current posturing and threats, EU negotiators are inevitably encouraging importers like Wetherspoon to look elsewhere for supplies. This process is unlikely to have adverse effects on the UK economy, as companies will be able to switch to suppliers representing the 93 percent of the world's population which is not in the EU, but this evolution will eventually be highly damaging to the economy of the EU. Wetherspoon is extremely confident that it can switch from EU suppliers, if required, although we would be very reluctant to initiate such actions.feedback

Mark Garnier

As an international economic department we want to create more trading connections throughout the world, and we welcome ABP's contribution to the debate on how that can be achieved.feedback

David Cheetham

It seems to be a positive time for sterling this week. We had the higher inflation data on Tuesday, the BoE yesterday, and today we've completed the hat trick: arguably the biggest dove on the MPC (Monetary Policy Committee) coming out in support of a rate hike in coming months if the conditions continue.feedback

Alex Barker

Paul was an inspiration to us all in the Brussels bureau, turning out some of the most original, insightful and deeply researched journalism on Brexit since the referendum. He had a rare gift: an eye for hidden stories, writing flair and the charm to make people tell him anything and everything.feedback

Carlos Ghosn - Renault

Until we know exactly what Brexit means, it's very difficult to make a decision in the dark.feedback

Paddy Ashdown

Is our obsession with Brexit in danger of distracting us from what kind of country we want Britain to be, whether in the EU or out of it? People see us, not as a force for change but as a part of the establishment.feedback

Dieter Kempf

In our eyes we would better see an EU without a Brexit or let's say an EU with the U.K. as a strong partner. However the population in Great Britain has decided, so we have to deal with that. We are now asking for strict and very serious negotiations about the details of the Brexit which we have not yet really seen from the British side.feedback

Guy Verhofstadt

It's like in a divorce and in a divorce when you go away you don't let all the bills with the rest of the family.feedback

Dieter Kempf

Of course we are concerned because the U.K. is one of our most important trade partners – or the most important trade partner in Europe for the German industry.feedback

Richard Falkenhall

The weakness of the GBP during summer reflects that a lot of bad news had been priced into it. Growth forecasts have been lowered and the Brexit negotiations have not shown any progress. Given these expectations it comes as no surprise as it reacts positively on some positive news in recent weeks and what seems like tighter monetary policy.feedback

Jane Foley - Rabobank International

GBP, however, is still vulnerable to political uncertainty. With the prospect of a cliff edge Brexit looming in 18 months, we see scope for further downside pressure in the pound vs the EUR medium term.feedback

Richard Falkenhall

Over the medium term we believe it is too early to expect a substantial recovery at this point. That said, we would turn more long-term positive on the GBP if Brexit negotiations showed some real progress in coming months. In the near-term, FX (currency) investors should look to buy GBP here in anticipation of further gains, as positioning in the market is skewed towards further liquidation of GBP shorts. This will probably bring the 0.8750/0.8800 range into view in EURGBP, at which point the market will be in a bit better balance.feedback

Stephen Gallo - BMO Capital Markets

At this stage, I would say that the BoE is probably no more certain than the FX market regarding when (exactly) it will move on rates. This will depend on the domestic U.K. economy, the path of Brexit negotiations and the pace of EUR appreciation as the ECB tapers.feedback

Simon Derrick - Bank of New York

Whilst the market was certainly pricing in the possibility of a rate hike in the next six months going into yesterday's meeting, there were very few people who genuinely believed that. (Vlieghe) was known to be a dove… Having a dove say something like that resonates far more than, say, Michael Saunders saying it.feedback

Vince Cable - Stansted Airport

I think to be frank it didn't play well in the general election - I think people didn't understand what we were trying to say. The way I now express it is as a first referendum on the facts, on the evidence, what we will know at the end of the negotiation is the likely path forward.feedback

Gertjan Vlieghe - Bank of England

There remains a risk that, at some stage, the uncertainty surrounding the Brexit process has a larger impact on the economy than we have seen so far. If that happens, monetary policy would respond appropriately. But for now, it seems the net effect of the many underlying forces acting on the UK economy is that slack is continually being eroded and wage pressure is gently building.feedback

Christopher Bailey - Burberry Group

Being able to share ideas, to collaborate with people from other cultures and countries, is fundamental to any creative business. Since we made that decision and bought that land a lot of things have changed in the world. When you have these big shifts you need to reflect. We are absolutely committed to keeping our manufacturing in this country with our factories in Yorkshire, but with the new site we are just taking a moment to make sure we understand the ramifications.feedback

Vince Cable - Stansted Airport

It's a bit like being handcuffed to a radiator in the basement of a flat in Beirut and she is at the mercy of other people. The minute she shows a sign of independence of mind there will be 70 letters that will go into the chairman of the '22 committee [the Tories' influential backbench group of MPs] and she'll be out.feedback

Tim Martin

It is my view that the main risk from the current Brexit negotiations is not to Wetherspoon, but to our excellent EU suppliers - and to EU economies. Juncker, Barnier, Selmayr, Verhofstadt and others need to take a wise-up pill in order to avoid causing further economic damage to struggling economies like Greece, Portugal, Spain and Italy - where youth unemployment, in particular, is at epidemic levels.feedback

Chuka Umunna

He refused to do so. He promised to guarantee the rights of EU citizens living in Britain, and nothing has happened. No one can trust a word he says. The £350m a week promise was a fib, and there is absolutely no chance of it being delivered. Boris should be apologising for his disgraceful conduct in the referendum, not continually making the same impossible promises.feedback

Chris Greenhalgh

We had a lot of interest from Italians working in London who decided it was time to come back. This has been a trend since Brexit.feedback

Raffaele Petrone

You don't move back to Italy to get a tax break, but it's a good incentive when you're thinking about your next step.feedback

share this quote