Martin Kettle

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Last quote by Martin Kettle

The prime minister is sustained by the knowledge within her party that the alternatives are worse. As a rule, a politician who announces “I’m not a quitter” is not in a strong place. When Theresa May said those words in Japan this week, for instance, the mind quickly turned to Richard Nixon. “I have never been a quitter,” Nixon told the American people in a televised address. The address in question was the one in which he announced his resignation as president in 1974.feedback
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We found 22 articles in which Martin Kettle said something. The most recent Martin Kettle’s quote is: “Though the German chancellor is set to win, she faces the prospect of coalition building and a need to address a raft of national concerns. You would hardly know this is general election year in Germany. I have travelled to Europe’s most important country three times this year, and each time to a very different part of it – first to Hamburg in the north, then to the flatlands of Brandenburg in the far east and, most recently, to prosperous Bavaria in the south. Yet until this week, when the campaign eased into gear, you would have struggled to realise that Europe’s most pivotal political contest is imminent.”. In addition, all sources we refer have quoted Martin Kettle 23 times. On this page, you will find all of Martin Kettle’s quotes organized by date and topic.
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Martin Kettle quotes

Jun 02 2017 - British elections 2017

Britain is caught in a trap of the prime minister’s making: between a Europe it rejects and an America it should reject. Which is the real ally?Six weeks ago Theresa May stood in Downing Street and announced that Britain needed a general election to strengthen her hand on Europe. This week, after a reputation-denting campaign in which she has failed to debate Europe or anything else, she has returned to the Brexit theme.feedback

May 18 2017 - British elections 2017

The prime minister offers a new kind of conservatism, promoting good government over free markets. But she lacks a broad base of support across her party. At the end of her election manifesto launch press conference in Halifax, Theresa May was asked whether the document she had just launched embodied something we could now describe as “Mayism”. Her reply was emphatic. “There is no Mayism,” she intoned, “there is good solid conservatism which puts the interests of the country and the interests of ordinary working people at the heart of everything we do in government.”.feedback

May 11 2017 - Labour Party

While this is a more nuanced prospectus than the right claims, it is too starry-eyed about the state’s role – and has some glaring fudges. How seriously should one take the Labour manifesto? In a serious election it ought to matter a lot. Yet everything about Labour at the moment – the manifesto included – reflects the sleepless battle for control of the party, rather than any serious engagement with non-Labour Britain. Oddly, though, this means there is some unity about the manifesto. The Corbynites want to run on a leftwing manifesto for reasons of ideology, but Jeremy Corbyn’s opponents want that too, so that Corbyn can own the defeat they expect on 8 June.feedback

May 05 2017 - Democratic Party

The party is bubbling with optimism, but after its 2015 wipeout it’s not about to overturn the status quo in this election. There is a gaping Emmanuel Macron-shaped hole in British electoral politics, but no one to fill it. When I wrote this recently, I got a cheerfully indignant email from a Liberal Democrat ex-MP. How could I dismiss Tim Farron’s claims so easily, he complained. Like Macron, he said, Farron was young, liberal, progressive and pro-Europe. And in this general election Farron is campaigning on Brexit, “the overriding national and international issue” of the day, “rather than on mending pavements and saving post offices”. Watch this space, he wrote.feedback

May 03 2017 - Trump Presidency

Her statement decrying EU meddling in the election was right out of the Donald Trump playbook. It’s consensus, not conflict, that will get Britain the deal it needs. The opinion polls may show the Conservatives nearly 20 points ahead of Labour, but the signs from Theresa May’s camp this week are that they are getting surprisingly twitchy. Improbable though this may seem – and it almost certainly is a bluff – it is a reminder that May has put her own job on the line for the next five weeks, and that she will be destroyed politically if her snap poll does not work.feedback

Apr 20 2017 - French election 2017

A victory for Emmanuel Macron would be the best outcome for the French, and the least worst option for us too with Brexit negotiations looming. Britain’s political class has a long and damaging record of not taking politics in continental Europe seriously. A collective insularity tempered only by a worship of all things American ensures that a minor event like this week’s congressional byelection in the suburbs of Atlanta is more likely to register inside the British bubble than, say, the critical contest hotting up for the leadership of Spain’s influential but divided Socialist party.feedback

Apr 11 2017 - Russia

We shouldn’t overstate the foreign secretary’s powers where Russia and the G7 are concerned. The truth is, the prime minister will make all the big decisions. Boris Johnson is incapable of flying below the radar. So the cancellation of his visit to Moscow last weekend, which would barely have been noticed if Britain possessed a greyer foreign secretary, is being seen by some as another career crisis for this emotionally neediest of politicians. True, it is a tad embarrassing for the foreign secretary to be pulled off the plane to Russia as if he was some surplus United Airlines passenger on an overbooked flight. But let’s not exaggerate it by being wedded to the worn-out narrative that everything that Johnson does is always either fascinating or important.feedback

Mar 31 2017 - Scottish independence

One needs a deal she can sell in Scotland; the other is being dragged towards a new referendum. For both, the odds of success are slim. In the pivotal scene of Alexander Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin, the heroine Tatyana writes a disastrously counterproductive love letter to the aloof hero. Mistaking Onegin’s reserve for nobility of character, Tatyana throws herself upon him. The scene that follows is one of the most touching in all of European opera.feedback

Mar 23 2017 - 2017 UK Parliament attack

The core beliefs voiced by the prime minister after the Westminster attack were laudable. Will we ever see them put into practice?Modern politics is remorseless, and modern politicians cannot opt out. Even when life and limb are at stake, a political leader has always at some point to ask the vulgar question: how will this play?feedback

Mar 17 2017 - Scottish independence

From Brexit to Scotland, the prime minister has become one of modern politics’ greatest risk-takers. It could mean the end of the UK. When the horses line up for the Cheltenham Gold Cup this afternoon, it would be astonishing to learn that Theresa May had her feet up and was watching the race on television. Still less that she had put a pot of her money on a well-priced outsider.feedback

Mar 02 2017 - Labour Party

The party’s supporters voted two to one to remain, so why does Jeremy Corbyn kowtow to the leavers?If you are unfortunate enough to be standing on a burning drilling platform in the North Sea, you face an unenviable choice. Stay on the platform and the blaze will kill you; leap into the sea and, if you are still alive after you hit the water, you risk a rapid death from exposure.feedback

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